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Incorporate Pilates Conditioning into Your Denver Physical Therapy


December 21, 2016

Interested in learning more about Pilates? Or maybe your doctor has recommended the exercise as a form of recovery from an injury. Whatever the reason, incorporating Pilates conditioning into your physical therapy routine could be an excellent option for you. The Pilates Method of exercise was developed by Joseph Pilates in the 1920s. Pilates focuses on using core strength and flexibility to bring the body together. It was originally used as a rehabilitation program for prisoners of war and was later found to be of great benefit to anyone seeking a higher level of fitness. His methods were kept alive by a small group of devoted students until just a few years ago when science caught up to the principles of Pilates’ teachings.

Pilates exercises are done either on a mat or on Pilates equipment. The workout equipment has graduated levels of springs and utilizes pulleys and resistance from the participant’s own body. One of the most well-known pieces of Pilates equipment is called the reformer and is used in Pilates studios everywhere.

What is Pilates?

What is Pilates you might ask? Let’s start with what makes Pilates different than other forms of exercise. There are six principles in Pilates that help you slow down and focus on core work, which connects the function of your entire body. These principles include:
  1. Centering
  2. Control
  3. Flow
  4. Breath
  5. Precision
  6. Concentration
For example, running puts a lot of focus on cardio exercise and leg strength but not much focus on the strength of the entire body, which can ultimately lead to injury. Pilates approaches this with a core first method which emphasizes quality over quantity, and you will find that unlike many systems of exercise, Pilates exercises do not include a lot of repetitions for each move. Instead, doing each exercise fully, with precision, yields significant results in a shorter time than you would ever imagine.

Core Strength

As you develop your core strength you develop stability throughout your entire torso and gain control over your body. This is one of the ways Pilates can help overcome back pain. Core strength is the foundation of Pilates exercise. The core muscles are the deep, internal muscles of the abdomen and back. When the core muscles are strong, your body can work in unison, as the trunk is properly stabilized, pressure on the back is relieved and the body is able to move freely and efficiently. Core strength is the foundation to a health body and lifestyle. Practicing the Pilates Method will surely help you gain control of your life.

Not sure if Pilates is for you? Why don’t you try out a class! We offer pilates to all type of individuals at Cherry Creek Wellness. Our Denver Physical therapists incorporate Pilates conditioning into rehabilitative exercise and physical therapy programs designed to speed recovery from musculoskeletal injuries. We provide private and semi-private Pilates classes to give you the individualized attention you need for optimal rehabilitation. Our group Pilates rehab classes are another fun and affordable option. Call us today to get on your way to a better, pain-free life at  303-333-3493.
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